Lockere Leine (Die Hundeschule)

 12,40

Lockere Leine (Die Hundeschule)

Taschenbuch – 28. Januar 2015
von Monika Schaal (Autor), Ursula Daugschieß-Thumm (Autor)

Hundebesitzer wissen, wie beschwerlich der Weg sein kann, bis der Hund gerne und entspannt neben einem an der Leine läuft. Dass es Spaß machen kann, mit dem Hund dieses Problem anzugehen, zeigt dieser Ratgeber aus der neu konzipierten Reihe “Die Hundeschule”.

 

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SKU: 978-3275016211 Category: Tags: , ,

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Lockere Leine (Die Hundeschule)

Taschenbuch – 28. Januar 2015
von Monika Schaal (Autor), Ursula Daugschieß-Thumm (Autor)

Hundebesitzer wissen, wie beschwerlich der Weg sein kann, bis der Hund gerne und entspannt neben einem an der Leine läuft. Dass es Spaß machen kann, mit dem Hund dieses Problem anzugehen, zeigt dieser Ratgeber aus der neu konzipierten Reihe “Die Hundeschule”. Die Autorinnen beschreiben anhand von zahlreichen Beispielen, wie die Leinenführigkeit trainiert werden kann. Dabei erläutern sie unterschiedliche Methoden, besprechen verschiedene Alltagssituationen und gehen ausführlich auf Probleme ein. So wird der Hund zum angenehmen Begleiter. Hund zieht an der Leine.

 

General information (product independent) to:
How to Prevent Your Dog From Pulling on the Leash

One of the most common behavior problems that pet parents have with their puppies and sometimes even their adult dogs is pulling on the leash. Dogs are like people in that bad habits are hard to break. It is much easier to prevent the problem than to correct it once it has become a habit. Reward based training is one of the most effective training methods available.

Get the Right Equipment
Most dogs can be taught not to pull with just a regular buckle collar and a six foot leash. Do not use a prong collar, shock collar, or choke collar for training your pup. These collars can cause unnecessary pain and even trauma to your pup’s throat. It is more effective to use positive reinforcement by use of reward based training to teach your dog what behavior you expect from her. If you are having trouble teaching your pet not to pull, a head collar such as a Gentle Leader or a Halti may be beneficial. Head collars gently turn the dog’s head and body towards you if she is pulling on her leash.

Find the Perfect Reward
The right reward is just as important as the equipment being used for the training. Find a food reward or treat that your pup cannot resist. You may also use a portion of your dog’s daily ration of dry kibble as a food reward. This prevents overfeeding your pup which can lead to obesity. Remember though that the teach a dog a new behavior, you have to have a reward that is more desirable than anything else the dog may want, so you will still want to have a highly valued food reward for your pup.

Clickers can also be used as a reward. In the beginning, pair the clicker with a food reward to teach your pup that the clicker is something positive (the reward) and reinforces the desired behavior. Clickers can be a great teaching tool if used correctly. The key is in the timing. The click must be given immediately when the pup performs the desired behavior. If the moment passes, the pup will not associate the clicker reward with the desired behavior.

Do not forget about the power of praise. Praise along with a good scratch behind the ears can also be used as a reward. As with any other reward, timing is important. Be sure to immediately reward the desired behavior so your pup understands what behavior you expect of her.

Use Reward-Based Training
Keep in mind when teaching loose leash walking that if you continue to walk while your puppy is pulling, you are, in fact, teaching your dog to pull.

First, put the collar and leash on the puppy and stand in one place. Give your puppy enough leash so he can walk about four feet from you. Reward your puppy every time the leash goes slack. In the beginning, it is most effective to pair a food reward with praise and a clicker reward (if you are going to clicker train). Remember that pups have a very short memory and the reward must be immediate.

When you are ready to begin walking say “let’s go” and take a few steps. The goal is to have the pup’s nose even with your leg. If she starts to get ahead of you, change direction. By changing direction, this keeps you in front and prevents your pup from pulling. Be sure to reward her when she is in the desired position (either a food reward, praise, or clicker). In the beginning, be sure to lavish your pup with a high value reward such as several of her absolute favorite treats and praise for performing the desired behavior. As the puppy masters the behavior, you can decrease the number of treats and begin to replace the food reward with praise.

Try not to yank or “check” the leash if she pulls, which is a natural response. If it is difficult for you to stop “checking,” put your leash hand in your pocket. You should also try to be very vocal with your puppy. Puppies have a very short attention span, and talking in a high pitched voice will help your puppy keep his attention on you.

Do not attempt the training if your puppy has been crated for several hours. Have playtime first to burn off some energy, and then start the lesson when your puppy is a little more mellow. Do not get the puppy too tired though, or she may not be very attentive.

When you can walk your puppy and hold the leash and a glass of water in the same hand you have mastered loose leash walking!

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